Work Smarter Not Harder 28 Tips That Boost Your Work Day

Work Smarter Bot Harder 28 Tips That Boost Your Work Day

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How to Read This Book

Who is This Book For?

This book is mainly geared towards office workers (both at home or in a cubicle).

While the tips are mainly geared towards those who have a day job, all the advice can be applied to home offices, too.

Even if you don’t work in those particular environments, you can still pick up some valuable tips to improve your everyday performance.

Introduction

1. Write Things Down
2. Track Your (Deep Work) Hours
3. Write an Operating Document
4. Show Your Skills
5. Take Advantage of Commuting Times
6. Maximize Your Evening and Morning Rituals
7. Set the Expectations Right
8. Preparation is the Key to Success
9. Turn off Electronics Early Enough
10. Switch Your Workspace Based on the Task
11. Walk Away from the Task – and Then Come Back
12. Keep Others Updated of the Status of Long-Running Task
13. Have a Status Meeting Every Day
14. Keep Perfection at Bay
15. Create Healthy Habits Almost by an Accident
16. Waiting Time Can Be Productive, Too
17. Don’t Let the Clutter Escalate
18. Have a Personal Knowledge Base
19. Create a Starting and Finishing Routine for Your Day
20. Try to Find an Eliminator Task in a Group of Similar Tasks
21. Ask: What Can I Do to Improve the Productivity for Others?
22. Use a Standing Desk
23. Know When You Are Working and When You Are Not
24. Buy Some Free Time with Your Salary
25. Let Others Know When They Can Interrupt You
26. Know Which Types of Tasks to Work on and When
27. Semi-Delay Your Email Checking
28. Feel Grateful for What You are Doing
Conclusion
Questions and Comments
You Might Also Like

About the Author

Timo Kiander runs a productivity blog called Productive Superdad. His blog helps individuals interested in personal productivity on two levels: By improving their personal productivity, at work or in life and becoming more organized.

Timo is also into endurance sports. He has run 18 marathons so far, and has already lost count of how many triathlons he has participated in. In his free time, he likes to spend as much time as possible with his wife and son.

Timo is very approachable and easy to get along with, so don’t hesitate to contact him if you have any questions regarding this book (or any other matter) by sending him an e-mail at: timo@productivesuperdad.com.

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Apache Hadoop CookBook Opensource Software Framework Written In Java

Apache Hadoop CookBook Free Download

Below is Book Index it has completely 199 Pages

  • “HelloWorld” Example
  • Introduction
  • Hadoop Word-Count Example
  • Setup
  • Mapper Code
  • Reducer Code
  • Putting it all together, The Driver Class
  • Running the example
  • Download the complete source code

1. How to Install Apache Hadoop on Ubuntu

  • Introduction
  • Prerequisites
  • Installing Java
  • Creating a Dedicated User
  • Disable ipv
  • Installing SSH and Setting up certificate
  • Installing Apache Hadoop
  • Download Apache Hadoop
  • Updating bash
  • Configuring Hadoop
  • Formatting the Hadoop Filesystem
  • Starting Apache Hadoop
  • Testing MapReduce Job
  • Stopping Apache Hadoop
  • Conclusion

Apache Hadoop Cookbook

2. FS Commands Example

  • Introduction
  • Common Commands
  • Create a directory
  • List the content of the directory
  • Upload a file in HDFS
  • Download a file from HDFS
  • View the file content
  • Copying a file
  • Moving file from source to destination
  • Removing the file or the directory from HDFS
  • Displaying the tail of a file
  • Displaying the aggregate length of a particular file
  • Count the directories and files
  • Details of space in the file system
  • Conclusion

3. Cluster Setup Example

  • Introduction
  • Requirements
  • Preparing Virtual Machine
  • Creating VM and Installing Guest OS
  • Installing Guest Additions
  • Creating Cluster of Virtual Machines
  • VM Network settings
  • Cloning the Virtual Machine
  • Testing the network IPs assigned to VMs
  • Converting to Static IPs for VMs
  • Hadoop prerequisite settings
  • Creating User
  • Disable ipv
  • Connecting the machines (SSH Access)
  • Hadoop Setup
  • Download Hadoop
  • Update bashrc
  • Configuring Hadoop
  • Formatting the Namenode
  • Start the Distributed Format System
  • Testing MapReduce Job
  • Stopping the Distributed Format System
  • Conclusion
  • Download configuration files

Apache Hadoop Cookbook

4. Distcp Example

  • Introduction
  • Syntax and Examples
  • Basic
  • Multiple Sources
  • Update and Overwrite Flag
  • Ignore Failures Flag
  • Maximum Map Tasks
  • Final Notes

5. Distributed File System Explained

  • Introduction
  • HDFS Design
  • System failures
  • Can handle large amount of data
  • Coherency Model
  • Portability
  • HDFS Nodes
  • NameNode
  • DataNode
  • HDFS Architecture
  • Working of NameNode and DataNode
  • HDFS Namespace
  • Data Replication
  • Failures
  • Data Accessibility
  • Configuring HDFS
  • Configuring HDFS
  • Formating NameNode
  • Starting the HDFS
  • Interacting with HDFS using Shell
  • Creating a directory
  • List the content of the directory
  • Upload a file in HDFS
  • Download a file from HDFS
  • Interacting with HDFS using MapReduce
  • Conclusion
  • Download the code

Apache Hadoop Cookbook

6.Distributed Cache Example

  • Introduction
  • Working
  • Implementation
  • The Driver Class
  • Map Class
  • Reduce Class
  • Executing the Hadoop Job
  • Conclusion
  • Download the Eclipse Project

7. Wordcount Example

  • Introduction
  • MapReduce
  • Word-Count Example
  • Setup
  • Mapper Code
  • Reducer Code
  • The Driver Class
  • Code Execution
  • In Eclipse IDE
  • On Hadoop Cluster
  • Conclusion
  • Download the Eclipse Project

8. Streaming Example

  • Introduction
  • Prerequisites and Assumptions
  • Hadoop Streaming Workflow
  • MapReduce Code in Python
  • Wordcount Example
  • Mapper
  • Reducer
  • Testing the Python code
  • Submitting and Executing the Job on Hadoop cluster
  • Input Data
  • Transferring input data to HDFS
  • Submitting the MapReduce Job
  • Understanding the Console Log
  • MapReduce Job Output
  • Conclusion
  • Download the Source Code

Apache Hadoop Cookbook

9. Zookeeper Example

  • Introduction
  • How Zookeeper Works?
  • Zookeeper Setup
  • System Requirements
  • Install Java
  • Download Zookeeper
  • Data Directory
  • Configuration File
  • Starting The Server
  • Zookeeper Server Basic Interaction
  • Starting The CLI
  • Creating The First Znode
  • Retrieving Data From The First Znode
  • Modifying Data in Znode
  • Creating A Subnode
  • Removing A Node
  • Conclusion

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Hadoop is an Apache Software Foundation project. It is the open source version inspired by Google MapReduce and Google File System.

It is designed for distributed processing of large data sets across a cluster of systems often running on commodity standard hardware.

Hadoop is designed with an assumption that all hardware fails sooner or later and the system should be robust and able to handle the hardware failures automatically.

Apache Hadoop consists of two core components, they are:

• Distributed File System called Hadoop Distributed File System or HDFS for short.
• Framework and API for MapReduce jobs.

In this example, we are going to demonstrate the second component of Hadoop framework called MapReduce and we will do so by Word Count Example (Hello World program of the Hadoop Ecosystem) but first we shall understand what MapReduce actually is.

MapReduce is basically a software framework or programming model, which enable users to write programs so that data can be processed parallelly across multiple systems in a cluster. MapReduce consists of two parts Map and Reduce.

• Map: Map task is performed using a map() function that basically performs filtering and sorting. This part is responsible for processing one or more chunks of data and producing the output results which are generally referred as intermediate results. As shown in the diagram below, map task is generally processed in parallel provided the mapping operation is independent of  each other.

• Reduce: Reduce task is performed by reduce() function and performs a summary operation. It is responsible for consolidating the results produced by each of the Map task.

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Linux Server Security Hack and Defend

Linux Server Security Hack and Defend – Free Book Download

Linux Server Security Hack and Defend – Free Book Download

Chapter 1: Invisibility Cloak 1

  • Background 1
  • Probing Ports 1
  • Confusing a Port Scanner 2
  • Installing knockd 2
  • Packages 3
  • Changing Default Settings 3
  • Altering Filesystem Locations 4
  • Some Confi g Options 5
  • Starting the Service 5
  • Changing the Default Network Interface 5
  • Packet Types and Timing 5
  • Testing Your Install 6
  • Port Knocking Clients 7
  • Making Your Server Invisible 7
  • Testing Your iptables 8
  • Saving iptables Rules 9
  • Further Considerations 10
  • Smartphone Client 10
  • Troubleshooting 10
  • Security Considerations 10
  • Ephemeral Sequences 11

Chapter 2: Digitally Fingerprint Your Files 13

  • Filesystem Integrity 13
  • Whole Filesystem 16
  • Rootkits 17
  • Confi guration 19
  • False Positives 21
  • Well Designed 22

Chapter 3: Twenty-First-Century Netcat 25

  • History 25
  • Installation Packages 27
  • Getting Started 27
  • Transferring Files 29
  • Chatting Example 30
  • Chaining Commands Together 30
  • Secure Communications 31
  • Executables 33
  • Access Control Lists 34
  • Miscellaneous Options 34

Chapter 4: Denying Service 37

  • NTP Infrastructure 37
  • NTP Refl ection Attacks 38
  • Attack Reporting 40
  • Preventing SNMP Refl ection 41
  • DNS Resolvers 42
  • Complicity 43
  • Bringing a Nation to Its Knees 44
  • Mapping Attacks 45

Chapter 5: Nping g 49

  • Functionality 49
  • TCP 50
  • Interpreter 51
  • UDP 52
  • ICMP 52
  • ARP 53
  • Payload Options 53
  • Echo Mode 54
  • Other Nping Options 57

Chapter 6: Logging Reconnoiters 59

  • ICMP Misconceptions 59
  • tcpdump 60
  • Iptables 61
  • Multipart Rules 64
  • Log Everything for Forensic Analysis 64
  • Hardening 65

Chapter 7: Nmap’s Prodigious NSE 69

  • Basic Port Scanning 69
  • The Nmap Scripting Engine 71
  • Timing Templates 73
  • Categorizing Scripts 74
  • Contributing Factors 75
  • Security Holes 75
  • Authentication Checks 77
  • Discovery 78
  • Updating Scripts 79
  • Script Type 80
  • Regular Expressions 80
  • Graphical User Interfaces 81
  • Zenmap 81

Chapter 8: Malware Detection 85

  • Getting Started 85
  • Defi nition Update Frequency 85
  • Malware Hash Registry 86
  • Prevalent Threats 86
  • LMD Features 86
  • Monitoring Filesystems 88
  • Installation 88
  • Monitoring Modes 90
  • Confi guration 91
  • Exclusions 91
  • Running from the CLI 92
  • Reporting 92
  • Quarantining and Cleaning 93
  • Updating LMD 94
  • Scanning and Stopping Scans 94
  • Cron Job 96
  • Reporting Malware 96
  • Apache Integration 96

Chapter 9: Password Cracking with Hashcat 99

  • History 99
  • Understanding Passwords 99
  • Keyspace 100
  • Hashes 101
  • Using Hashcat 103
  • Hashcat Capabilities 103
  • Installation 103
  • Hash Identification 104
  • Choosing Attack Mode 106
  • Downloading a Wordlist 106
  • Rainbow Tables 107
  • Running Hashcat 107
  • oclHashcat 110
  • Hashcat-Utils 111

Chapter 10: SQL Injection Attacks 113

  • History 113
  • Basic SQLi 114
  • Mitigating SQLi in PHP 115
  • Exploiting SQL Flaws 117
  • Launching an Attack 118
  • Trying SQLi Legally 120

Index 123

Linux Server Security – Hack and Defend Free Book Download

The chapters contained within this book can be read in any order and are a collection of security topics that have interested the author on his journey as an Internet user over the years

The topics vary from the theory of past, current, and future attacks, to the mitigation and defense from a variety of online attacks, all the way to empowering readers to perform malicious attacks themselves (in the hope they will learn how to defend against such attacks)

By separating the various topics into chapters, the subjects can be referenced and returned to in the future to allow the reader to recount the content in greater detail The content of each chapters is as follows:

Chapter 1: Invisibility Cloak: If an attacker can’t see your server and isn’t aware of its existence, then there isn’t any attack vector to exploit in the fi rst place We discuss and demonstrate how to continue using services in production but without the unwelcome attention of attackers

Chapter 2: Digitally Fingerprint Your Files: There are a number ways of keeping an eye on the integrity of your server’s fi lesystems to ensure attackers haven’t gained access In this chapter we look at both a manual method and an automated tool that checks for rootkits

Chapter 3: Twenty-First-Century Netcat: Steeped in history, the modern-day version of Netcat, thanks to its multitude of advanced features, has become a hacker’s tool of choice Learn how to spot if such a tool is being used against your servers and additionally how to utilize its industry-leading functionality

Chapter 4: Denying Service: Only a handful of the world’s largest Internet infrastructure providers can withstand the devastating effects of a full-fl edged, high-capacity Distributed Denial of Service attack In this chapter we discuss the topic in detail and even comment on an entire country losing Internet connectivity for three weeks due to such an attack

Chapter 5: Nping: Knowing which services a host is running is only half the battle This extension of the powerful Nmap security tool allows you to check just that on any host and also craft custom packets with unique payloads

Chapter 6: Logging Reconnoiters: Although certain probes executed against your server might seem harmless enough, there is little doubt that being aware of how they work helps you secure your server further We examine several facets of an attacker reconnoitering your server’s vulnerable points

Chapter 7: Nmap’s Prodigious NSE: Many users will have used Nmap for simple port scans, but few know that the security tool includes the ability to exploit remote machines too Weexplore just some of the many possibilities starting with the plethora of scripts that Nmapships with by default

Chapter 8: Malware Detection: A sometimes entirely silent threat that has plagued Windows systems for years comes in the form of illegitimately installed software The damage that can be done to a system by malware ranges from annoying pop-up windows to full-fl edged online banking compromises In this chapter we learn how to deploy a sophisticated, frequently updated anti-malware solution on Linux

Chapter 9: Password Cracking with Hashcat: Technical professionals might be alarmed to discover that one password-cracking tool all but guarantees that it can crack a hashed password This means that if access to your hashed password is gained illegitimately, then it’s just a matter of time before an attacker can see your password in plain text This chapter walks you through the process, step by step

Chapter 10: SQL Injection Attacks: In one prominent survey, SQL injection attacks were listed as the most prevalent online attack Despite the fact that this type of attack dates back to the late 1990s, even today a frighteningly large number of such attacks successfully exploit websites belonging to enterprises and key online services through poor programming practices This chapter offers some useful historical information along with step-bystep instructions on how to identify and exploit vulnerable online services

Linux Server Security – Hack and Defend

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User Mode Linux UML

User Mode Linux UML Free Book Download

User Mode Linux (UML) Book Download

Preface ix
Acknowledgments xi
About the Author xiii

1 Introduction 1
What Is UML? 1
Comparison with Other Virtualization Technologies 2
Why Virtual Machines? 3
A Bit of History 4
What Is UML Used For? 8
Server Consolidation 8
Education 10
Development 12
Disaster Recovery Practice 13
The Future 14

2 A Quick Look at UML 17
Booting UML for the First Time 20
Booting UML Successfully 24
Looking at a UML from the Inside and Outside 29
Conclusion 37

3 Exploring UML 39
Logging In as a Normal User 39
Consoles and Serial Lines 40
Adding Swap Space 47
Partitioned Disks 49
UML Disks as Raw Data 53
Networking 54
Shutting Down 59

4 A Second UML Instance 61
COW Files 61
Booting from COW Files 67
Moving a Backing File 69
Merging a COW File with Its Backing File 70
Networking the UML Instances 71
A Virtual Serial Line 79

5 Playing with a UML Instance 83
Use and Abuse of UML Block Devices 83
Networking and the Host 87

6 UML Filesystem Management 101
Mounting Host Directories within a UML 101
hostfs 104
humfs 108
Host Access to UML Filesystems 114
Making Backups 116
Extending Filesystems 117
When to Use What 118

7 UML Networking in Depth 121
Manually Setting Up Networking 121
TUN/TAP with Routing 121
Bridging 136
The UML Networking Transports 142
Access to the Host Network 143
Isolated Networks 145
pcap 145
How to Choose the Right Transport 146
Configuring the Transports 147
An Extended Example 155
A Multicast Network 155
A Second Multicast Network 156
Adding a uml_switch Network 160
Summary of the Networking Example 166

8 Managing UML Instances from the Host 167
The Management Console 167
MConsole Queries 168
The uml_mconsole Client 182
The MConsole Protocol 183
The MConsole Perl Library 185
Requests Handled in Process and Interrupt Contexts 186
MConsole Notifications 186
Controlling a UML Instance with Signals 188

9 Host Setup for a Small UML Server 191
Host Kernel Version 192
UML Execution Modes 194
tt Mode 197
skas3 Mode 198
skas0 Mode 200
To Patch or Not to Patch? 201
Vanderpool and Pacifica 202
Managing Long-Lived UML Instances 203
Networking 206
UML Physical Memory 206
Host Memory Consumption 208
umid Directories 209
Overall Recommendations 209

10 Large UML Server Management 211
Security 212
UML Configuration 212
Jailing UML Instances 216
Providing Console Access Securely 223
skas3 versus skas0 225
Future Enhancements 226
sysemu 226
PTRACE_FAULTINFO 227
MADV_TRUNCATE 227
remap_file_pages 230
VCPU 231
Final Points 232

11 Compiling UML from Source 233
Downloading UML Source 234
Configuration 235
Useful Configuration Options 240
Compilation 249

12 Specialized UML Configurations 251
Large Numbers of Devices 252
Network Interfaces 252
Memory 257
Clusters 265
Getting Started 265
Booting the Cluster 268
Exercises 272
Other Clusters 273
UML as a Decision-Making Tool for Hardware 273

13 The Future of UML 275
The externfs Filesystem 277
Virtual Processes 282
Captive UML 283
Secure mod_perl 283
Evolution 286
Application Administration 287
A Standard Application Programming Interface 289
Application-Level Clustering 289
Virtualized Subsystems 295
Conclusion 298
A UML Command-Line Options 301
Device and Hardware Specifications 301
Debugging Options 303
Management Options 304
Informational Options 305
B UML Utilities Reference 307
humfsify 307
uml_moo 308
uml_mconsole 308
tunctl 310
uml_switch 311
Internal Utilities 312

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About Author JeffDike

Jeff Dike grew up in rural northwest Connecticut He graduated from MIT and went to work at Digital Equipment Corporation in New Hampshire. There he met several people who became prominent in the Linux world, including Jon Hall and a large contingent that now works at Red Hat. Jeff left Digital in 1993 during the implosion of the minicomputer market. He spent the next decade as an independent contractor and became a Linux kernel developer in 1999 after conceiving of and implementing UML Since then, UML has been his job, becoming a full-time paid one in mid-2004 when Intel hired him.

Application Performance Management (APM) for Free Book

Content in Book  Application Performance Management (APM)

Introduction 1
About This Book
Icons Used in This Book

Chapter 1: Understanding What Application
Performance Management Is
Complex Application and Infrastructure
Landscape
Different Elements of APM
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Applications

Chapter 2: From the Driver’s Seat:
Digital Experience Monitoring
Understanding User Behaviors and Patterns
DEM
RUM
STM

Chapter 3: Looking Under the Hood:
Transaction Tracing
Following Application Transactions
Across All Components
Monitoring Performance at the Code
Level at Every Step
Tracing Transactions

Chapter 4: Horsepower and Fuel Efficiency
Instrumentation: Keeping It Light
Dealing with Lots of Data — Every
Transaction Matters
Applying Big Data Techniques
Leveraging Analytics to Detect Patterns and
Problems

Chapter 5: Exploring the Application
Performance Management Terrain
Monitor Application Performance and SLA Compliance
Perform Triage
Troubleshoot Application Performance
Map Application Dependencies
Manage Application Performance in the Cloud
Manage Performance with Application and Infrastructure Change

Chapter 6: Application Performance
Management Evaluation Criteria
Digital Experience Monitoring (DEM)
Transaction Tracing
Application Discovery and Mapping
Applications Analytics

Application Performance Management For Dummies

Application Performance Management For Dummies, 2nd Riverbed Special Edition, introduces you to application performance management (APM) solutions and how these tools can help you monitor and troubleshoot your mission-critical applications — from the perspective of your users, as well as your systems.

About This Book

This book contains volumes of information that rival a map of the human genome, conveniently distilled into six short chapters chock-full of just the information you need! Each chapter is individually wrapped (but not packaged for individual sale) and written to stand on its own, so feel free to start reading anywhere and hop, skip, or jump between chapters (or around your office)! Here’s a brief look at what awaits you.

Chapter 1: Understanding What Application Performance Management Is. I begin by exploring some application trends and different elements of APM, including monitoring and troubleshooting.
Chapter 2: From the Driver’s Seat: Digital Experience Monitoring. This chapter takes a look at application performance from the user’s perspective.
Chapter 3: Looking Under the Hood: Transaction Tracing. Here, you take an in-depth look at how application transaction tracing accelerates troubleshooting, and how APM helps bridge the workflow between application support and development.
Chapter 4: Horsepower and Fuel Efficiency. In this chapter, you learn to use a “big data approach” to deal with all of the data that APM collects.
Chapter 5: Exploring the Application Performance Management Terrain. Here, you learn about some creative uses for APM to help improve efficiency and effectiveness in your organization.
Chapter 6: Application Performance Management Evaluation Criteria. Here, in classic For Dummies style, I tell you about several important criteria to look for in an APM solution.

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Linux from scratch

Linux From Scratch Free Book Download

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Preface ……………….. viii
i. Foreword ……. viii
ii. Audience …… viii
iii. LFS Target Architectures ………….. ix
iv. LFS and Standards ……………………. x
v. Rationale for Packages in the Book ………… xi
vi. Prerequisites ….. xvi
vii. Host System Requirements …….. xvi
viii. Typography ………………………….. xix
ix. Structure ……. xx
x. Errata …………. xx
I. Introduction ………… 1
1. Introduction ….. 2
1.1. How to Build an LFS System 2
1.2. What’s new since the last release …….. 2
1.3. Changelog …………………………. 4
1.4. Resources ………………………….. 9
1.5. Help …… 10
II. Preparing for the Build ………………….. 12
2. Preparing a New Partition …………. 13
2.1. Introduction ……………………… 13
2.2. Creating a New Partition …… 13
2.3. Creating a File System on the Partition ……………………….. 14
2.4. Mounting the New Partition . 15
3. Packages and Patches ……………….. 16
3.1. Introduction ……………………… 16
3.2. All Packages ……………………. 16
3.3. Needed Patches ………………… 23
4. Final Preparations …………………….. 25
4.1. About $LFS …………………….. 25
4.2. Creating the $LFS/tools Directory …. 25
4.3. Adding the LFS User ……….. 26
4.4. Setting Up the Environment . 26
4.5. About SBUs …………………….. 28
4.6. About the Test Suites ……….. 28
5. Constructing a Temporary System 30
5.1. Introduction ……………………… 30
5.2. Toolchain Technical Notes … 30
5.3. General Compilation Instructions …… 32
5.4. Binutils-2.23.2 – Pass 1 …….. 34
5.5. GCC-4.8.1 – Pass 1 …………… 36
5.6. Linux-3.10.10 API Headers .. 39
5.7. Glibc-2.18 ……………………….. 40
5.8. Libstdc++-4.8.1 ………………… 43
5.9. Binutils-2.23.2 – Pass 2 …….. 45
5.10. GCC-4.8.1 – Pass 2 …………. 47
5.11. Tcl-8.6.0 ………………………… 51
5.12. Expect-5.45 ……………………. 53
5.13. DejaGNU-1.5.1 ………………. 55
5.14. Check-0.9.10 ………………….. 56
5.15. Ncurses-5.9 ……………………. 57
5.16. Bash-4.2 ………………………… 58
5.17. Bzip2-1.0.6 …………………….. 59
5.18. Coreutils-8.21 …………………. 60
5.19. Diffutils-3.3 ……………………. 61
5.20. File-5.14 ………………………… 62
5.21. Findutils-4.4.2 ………………… 63
5.22. Gawk-4.1.0 …………………….. 64
5.23. Gettext-0.18.3 …………………. 65
5.24. Grep-2.14 ………………………. 66
5.25. Gzip-1.6 …………………………. 67
5.26. M4-1.4.16 ………………………. 68
5.27. Make-3.82 ……………………… 69
5.28. Patch-2.7.1 …………………….. 70
5.29. Perl-5.18.1 ……………………… 71
5.30. Sed-4.2.2 ……………………….. 72
5.31. Tar-1.26 …………………………. 73
5.32. Texinfo-5.1 …………………….. 74
5.33. Xz-5.0.5 …………………………. 75
5.34. Stripping ………………………… 76
5.35. Changing Ownership ………. 76
III. Building the LFS System ……………… 77
6. Installing Basic System Software .. 78
6.1. Introduction ……………………… 78
6.2. Preparing Virtual Kernel File Systems …………………………. 78
6.3. Package Management ……….. 80
6.4. Entering the Chroot Environment ….. 83
6.5. Creating Directories ………….. 84
6.6. Creating Essential Files and Symlinks …………………………. 85
6.7. Linux-3.10.10 API Headers .. 88
6.8. Man-pages-3.53 ………………… 89
6.9. Glibc-2.18 ……………………….. 90
6.10. Adjusting the Toolchain ….. 98
6.11. Zlib-1.2.8 ……………………… 100
6.12. File-5.14 ………………………. 101
6.13. Binutils-2.23.2 ………………. 102
6.14. GMP-5.1.2 ……………………. 105
6.15. MPFR-3.1.2 ………………….. 107
6.16. MPC-1.0.1 ……………………. 108
6.17. GCC-4.8.1 ……………………. 109
6.18. Sed-4.2.2 ……………………… 114
6.19. Bzip2-1.0.6 …………………… 115
6.20. Pkg-config-0.28 …………….. 117
6.21. Ncurses-5.9 …………………… 118
6.22. Shadow-4.1.5.1 ……………… 121
6.23. Util-linux-2.23.2 ……………. 124
6.24. Psmisc-22.20 ………………… 129
6.25. Procps-ng-3.3.8 …………….. 130
6.26. E2fsprogs-1.42.8 …………… 132
6.27. Coreutils-8.21 ……………….. 135
6.28. Iana-Etc-2.30 ………………… 140
6.29. M4-1.4.16 …………………….. 141
6.30. Flex-2.5.37 …………………… 142
6.31. Bison-3.0 ……………………… 144
6.32. Grep-2.14 …………………….. 145
6.33. Readline-6.2 …………………. 146
6.34. Bash-4.2 ………………………. 148
6.35. Bc-1.06.95 ……………………. 150
6.36. Libtool-2.4.2 …………………. 151
6.37. GDBM-1.10 …………………. 152
6.38. Inetutils-1.9.1 ……………….. 153
6.39. Perl-5.18.1 ……………………. 155
6.40. Autoconf-2.69 ………………. 158
6.41. Automake-1.14 ……………… 159
6.42. Diffutils-3.3 ………………….. 161
6.43. Gawk-4.1.0 …………………… 162
6.44. Findutils-4.4.2 ………………. 163
6.45. Gettext-0.18.3 ……………….. 165
6.46. Groff-1.22.2 ………………….. 167
6.47. Xz-5.0.5 ……………………….. 170
6.48. GRUB-2.00 ………………….. 172
6.49. Less-458 ………………………. 174
6.50. Gzip-1.6 ……………………….. 175
6.51. IPRoute2-3.10.0 ……………. 177
6.52. Kbd-1.15.5 …………………… 179
6.53. Kmod-14 ……………………… 182
6.54. Libpipeline-1.2.4 …………… 184
6.55. Make-3.82 ……………………. 185
6.56. Man-DB-2.6.5 ………………. 186
6.57. Patch-2.7.1 …………………… 189
6.58. Sysklogd-1.5 …………………. 190
6.59. Sysvinit-2.88dsf ……………. 191
6.60. Tar-1.26 ……………………….. 193
6.61. Texinfo-5.1 …………………… 195
6.62. Udev-206 (Extracted from systemd-206) ………………….. 197
6.63. Vim-7.4 ……………………….. 199
6.64. About Debugging Symbols ………… 202
6.65. Stripping Again …………….. 202
6.66. Cleaning Up …………………. 203
7. Setting Up System Bootscripts …. 204
7.1. Introduction ……………………. 204
7.2. General Network Configuration …… 204
7.3. Customizing the /etc/hosts File …….. 207
7.4. Device and Module Handling on an LFS System ………… 208
7.5. Creating Custom Symlinks to Devices ……………………….. 212
7.6. LFS-Bootscripts-20130821 . 214
7.7. How Do These Bootscripts Work? .. 216
7.8. Configuring the system hostname … 218
7.9. Configuring the setclock Script ……. 219
7.10. Configuring the Linux Console ….. 219
7.11. Configuring the sysklogd Script …. 222
7.12. The rc.site File ……………… 222
7.13. The Bash Shell Startup Files ……… 225
7.14. Creating the /etc/inputrc File ……… 227
8. Making the LFS System Bootable ……….. 229
8.1. Introduction ……………………. 229
8.2. Creating the /etc/fstab File .. 229
8.3. Linux-3.10.10 …………………. 231
8.4. Using GRUB to Set Up the Boot Process …………………… 234
9. The End ……. 236
9.1. The End …………………………. 236
9.2. Get Counted …………………… 236
9.3. Rebooting the System ……… 236
9.4. What Now? ……………………. 238
IV. Appendices …… 239
A. Acronyms and Terms ……………… 240
B. Acknowledgments ………………….. 243
C. Dependencies …………………………. 246
D. Boot and sysconfig scripts version-20130821 …………………….. 256
D.1. /etc/rc.d/init.d/rc ……………… 256
D.2. /lib/lsb/init-functions ……….. 260
D.3. /etc/rc.d/init.d/functions …… 274
D.4. /etc/rc.d/init.d/mountvirtfs .. 288
D.5. /etc/rc.d/init.d/modules ……. 289
D.6. /etc/rc.d/init.d/udev …………. 291
D.7. /etc/rc.d/init.d/swap …………. 292
D.8. /etc/rc.d/init.d/setclock …….. 293
D.9. /etc/rc.d/init.d/checkfs ……… 294
D.10. /etc/rc.d/init.d/mountfs …… 297
D.11. /etc/rc.d/init.d/udev_retry . 298
D.12. /etc/rc.d/init.d/cleanfs ……. 300
D.13. /etc/rc.d/init.d/console ……. 302
D.14. /etc/rc.d/init.d/localnet …… 304
D.15. /etc/rc.d/init.d/sysctl ………. 305
D.16. /etc/rc.d/init.d/sysklogd ….. 306
D.17. /etc/rc.d/init.d/network …… 308
D.18. /etc/rc.d/init.d/sendsignals 309
D.19. /etc/rc.d/init.d/reboot ……… 311
D.20. /etc/rc.d/init.d/halt …………. 311
D.21. /etc/rc.d/init.d/template ….. 312
D.22. /etc/sysconfig/modules ….. 313
D.23. /etc/sysconfig/createfiles … 314
D.24. /etc/sysconfig/udev-retry .. 314
D.25. /sbin/ifup ……………………… 315
D.26. /sbin/ifdown …………………. 317
D.27. /lib/services/ipv4-static ….. 319
D.28. /lib/services/ipv4-static-route ……… 320
E. Udev configuration rules …………. 323
E.1. 55-lfs.rules …………………….. 323
F. LFS Licenses …………………………. 324
F.1. Creative Commons License 324
F.2. The MIT License ……………. 328
Index …………………. 329

Host System Requirements

Your host system should have the following software with the minimum versions indicated. This should not be an issue for most modern Linux distributions. Also note that many distributions will place software headers into separate packages, often in the form of “<package-name>-devel” or “<package-name>-dev”. Be sure to install those if your distribution provides them.

Earlier versions of the listed software packages may work, but has not been tested.

• Bash-3.2 (/bin/sh should be a symbolic or hard link to bash)
• Binutils-2.17 (Versions greater than 2.23.2 are not recommended as they have not been tested)
• Bison-2.3 (/usr/bin/yacc should be a link to bison or small script that executes bison)
• Bzip2-1.0.4
• Coreutils-6.9
• Diffutils-2.8.1
• Findutils-4.2.31
• Gawk-4.0.1 (/usr/bin/awk should be a link to gawk)
GCC-4.1.2 including the C++ compiler, g++ (Versions greater than 4.8.1 are not recommended as they have not been tested)
• Glibc-2.5.1 (Versions greater than 2.18 are not recommended as they have not been tested)
• Grep-2.5.1a
• Gzip-1.3.12
• Linux Kernel-2.6.32

The reason for the kernel version requirement is that we specify that version when building glibc in Chapter 6 at the recommendation of the developers. It is also required by udev.

If the host kernel is earlier than 2.6.32 you will need to replace the kernel with a more up to date version. There are two ways you can go about this. First, see if your Linux vendor provides a 2.6.32 or later kernel package. If so, you may wish to install it. If your vendor doesn’t offer an acceptable kernel package, or you would prefer not to install it, you can compile a kernel yourself. Instructions for compiling the kernel and configuring the boot loader (assuming the host uses GRUB) are located in Chapter 8.

• M4-1.4.10
• Make-3.81
• Patch-2.5.4
• Perl-5.8.8
• Sed-4.1.5
• Tar-1.18
• Texinfo-4.9
• Xz-5.0.0

Note that the symlinks mentioned above are required to build an LFS system using the instructions contained within this book. Symlinks that point to other software (such as dash, mawk, etc.) may work, but are not tested or supported by the LFS development team, and may require either deviation from the instructions or additional patches to some packages.

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python cook book

Python Cook Book Written by Sebastian

Author: Sebastian

Python Cook Book Index

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CSV Reader / Writer Example 1
1.1 The Basics . 1
1.2 Reading and writing dictionaries . 5
1.3 Download the Code Project . . . . 6
2 Decorator Tutorial 7
2.1 Understanding Functions . . . . . 7
2.2 Jumping into decorators 8
2.3 The Practice 9
2.4 Download the Code Project . . . . 14
3 Threading / Concurrency Example 15
3.1 Python _thread module 15
3.2 Python threading module . . . . . 16
3.2.1 Extending Thread . . . . . 16
3.2.2 Getting Current Thread Information . 17
3.2.3 Daemon Threads . . . . . 18
3.2.4 Joining Threads 20
3.2.5 Time Threads . 22
3.2.6 Events: Communication Between Threads . . . . 23
3.2.7 Locking Resources . . . . 24
3.2.8 Limiting Concurrent Access to Resources . . . . 29
3.2.9 Thread-Specific Data . . . 29
4 Logging Example 31
4.1 The Theory 31
4.1.1 Log Levels . . 31
4.1.2 Handlers . . . 32
4.1.3 Format . . . . 32
4.2 The Practice 33
4.3 Download the Code Project . . . . 39

Python Programming Cookbook iii
5 Django Tutorial 40
5.1 Creating the project . . 40
5.2 Creating our application . . . . . 40
5.3 Database Setup . . . . 41
5.4 The Public Page . . . . 45
5.5 Style Sheets 47
5.6 Download the Code Project . . . . 49
6 Dictionary Example 50
6.1 Define . . . 50
6.2 Read . . . . 50
6.3 Write . . . 52
6.4 Useful operations . . . 52
6.4.1 In (keyword) . 53
6.4.2 Len (built-in function) . . 53
6.4.3 keys() and values() . . . . 54
6.4.4 items() . . . . 55
6.4.5 update() . . . . 56
6.4.6 copy() . . . . . 56
6.5 Download the Code Project . . . . 57
7 Sockets Example 58
7.1 Creating a Socket . . . 58
7.2 Using a Socket . . . . 59
7.3 Disconnecting . . . . . 60
7.4 A Little Example Here 60
7.5 Non-blocking Sockets . 62
7.6 Download the Code Project . . . . 63
8 Map Example 64
8.1 Map Implementation . 64
8.2 Python’s Map . . . . . 65
8.3 Map Object 68
8.4 Download the Code Project . . . . 69
9 Subprocess Example 70
9.1 Convenience Functions 70
9.1.1 subprocess.call 70
9.1.2 subprocess.check_call . . 71
9.1.3 subprocess.check_output . 72
9.2 Popen . . . 72
9.3 Download the Code Project . . . . 74

Python Programming Cookbook iv
10 Send Email Example 75
10.1 The Basics of smtplib . 75
10.2 SSL and Authentication 76
10.3 Sending HTML . . . . 77
10.4 Sending Attachments . 78
10.5 Download the Code Project . . . . 80

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Learn Python

Learn Python Book Written by Fabrizio Romano

Author: Fabrizio Romano
Reviewers: Simone Burol,Julio Vicente,Trigo Guijarro,Veit Heller
Commissioning Editor: Akram Hussain
Acquisition Editor: Indrajit Das
Content Development Editors: Samantha Gonsalves,Adrian Raposo
Technical Editor: Siddhi Rane
Copy Editors:Janbal Dharmaraj,Kevin McGowan
Project Coordinator: Kinjal Bari
Proofreader: Safis Editing
Indexer: Priya Sane
Graphics: Kirk D’Penha, Abhinash Sahu
Production Coordinator: Melwyn D’sa
Cover Work: Melwyn D’sa

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Chapter 1: Introduction and First Steps – Take a Deep Breath 1
A proper introduction 2
Enter the Python 4
About Python 5
Portability 5
Coherence 5
Developer productivity 6
An extensive library 6
Software quality 6
Software integration 6
Satisfaction and enjoyment 7
What are the drawbacks? 7
Who is using Python today? 8
Setting up the environment 8
Python 2 versus Python 3 – the great debate 8
Installing Python 9
Setting up the Python interpreter 10
About virtualenv 12
Your first virtual environment 14
Your friend, the console 17
How you can run a Python program 17
Running Python scripts 18
Running the Python interactive shell 18
Running Python as a service 20
Running Python as a GUI application 20
How is Python code organized 21
How do we use modules and packages 22
Python’s execution model 25
Names and namespaces 25
Scopes 27
Object and classes 30
Guidelines on how to write good code 33
The Python culture 34
A note on the IDEs 35
Summary 36
Chapter 2: Built-in Data Types 37
Everything is an object 37
Mutable or immutable? That is the question 38
Numbers 40
Integers 40
Booleans 42
Reals 43
Complex numbers 44
Fractions and decimals 45
Immutable sequences 46
Strings and bytes 46
Encoding and decoding strings 47
Indexing and slicing strings 48
Tuples 49
Mutable sequences 50
Lists 50
Byte arrays 54
Set types 55
Mapping types – dictionaries 57
The collections module 62
Named tuples 62
Defaultdict 64
ChainMap 65
Final considerations 66
Small values caching 66
How to choose data structures 67
About indexing and slicing 68
About the names 70
Summary 70
Chapter 3: Iterating and Making Decisions 73
Conditional programming 74
A specialized else: elif 75
The ternary operator 77
Looping 78
The for loop 78
Iterating over a range 79
Iterating over a sequence 80
Iterators and iterables 81
Iterating over multiple sequences 83
The while loop 85
The break and continue statements 88
A special else clause 90
Putting this all together 91
Example 1 – a prime generator 92
Example 2 – applying discounts 94
A quick peek at the itertools module 97
Infinite iterators 98
Iterators terminating on the shortest input sequence 98
Combinatoric generators 99
Summary 100
Chapter 4: Functions, the Building Blocks of Code 101
Why use functions? 102
Reduce code duplication 103
Splitting a complex task 103
Hide implementation details 104
Improve readability 105
Improve traceability 106
Scopes and name resolution 107
The global and nonlocal statements 108
Input parameters 110
Argument passing 111
Assignment to argument names don’t affect the caller 112
Changing a mutable affects the caller 112
How to specify input parameters 113
Positional arguments 113
Keyword arguments and default values 114
Variable positional arguments 115
Variable keyword arguments 116
Keyword-only arguments 117
Combining input parameters 118
Avoid the trap! Mutable defaults 120
Return values 121
Returning multiple values 123
A few useful tips 124
Recursive functions 125
Anonymous functions 126
Function attributes 127
Built-in functions 128
One final example 129
Documenting your code 130
Importing objects 131
Relative imports 133
Summary 134
Chapter 5: Saving Time and Memory 135
map, zip, and filter 137
map 137
zip 140
filter 141
Comprehensions 142
Nested comprehensions 143
Filtering a comprehension 144
dict comprehensions 146
set comprehensions 147
Generators 148
Generator functions 148
Going beyond next 151
The yield from expression 155
Generator expressions 156
Some performance considerations 159
Don’t overdo comprehensions and generators 162
Name localization 167
Generation behavior in built-ins 168
One last example 169
Summary 171
Chapter 6: Advanced Concepts – OOP, Decorators and Iterators 173
Decorators 173
A decorator factory 180
Object-oriented programming 182
The simplest Python class 182
Class and object namespaces 183
Attribute shadowing 184
I, me, and myself – using the self variable 186
Initializing an instance 187
OOP is about code reuse 187
Inheritance and composition 188
Accessing a base class 192
Multiple inheritance 194
Method resolution order 197
Static and class methods 200
Static methods 200
Class methods 202
Private methods and name mangling 204
The property decorator 206
Operator overloading 208
Polymorphism – a brief overview 209
Writing a custom iterator 210
Summary 211
Chapter 7: Testing, Profiling, and Dealing with Exceptions 213
Testing your application 214
The anatomy of a test 216
Testing guidelines 217
Unit testing 218
Writing a unit test 219
Mock objects and patching 220
Assertions 221
A classic unit test example 221
Making a test fail 224
Interface testing 225
Comparing tests with and without mocks 225
Boundaries and granularity 228
A more interesting example 229
Test-driven development 233
Exceptions 235
Profiling Python 241
When to profile? 244
Summary 245
Chapter 8: The Edges – GUIs and Scripts 247
First approach – scripting 250
The imports 250
Parsing arguments 251
The business logic 253
Second approach – a GUI application 258
The imports 260
The layout logic 261
The business logic 265
Fetching the web page 265
Saving the images 267
Alerting the user 271
How to improve the application? 272
Where do we go from here? 273
The tkinter.tix module 273
The turtle module 274
wxPython, PyQt, and PyGTK 274
The principle of least astonishment 275
Threading considerations 275
Summary 276
Chapter 9: Data Science 277
IPython and Jupyter notebook 278
Dealing with data 281
Setting up the notebook 282
Preparing the data 283
Cleaning the data 287
Creating the DataFrame 289
Unpacking the campaign name 291
Unpacking the user data 293
Cleaning everything up 297
Saving the DataFrame to a file 298
Visualizing the results 299
Where do we go from here? 307
Summary 308
Chapter 10: Web Development Done Right 309
What is the Web? 309
How does the Web work? 310
The Django web framework 311
Django design philosophy 311
The model layer 312
The view layer 312
The template layer 313
The Django URL dispatcher 313
Regular expressions 314
A regex website 314
Setting up Django 315
Starting the project 315
Creating users 317
Adding the Entry model 318
Customizing the admin panel 320
Creating the form 322
Writing the views 323
The home view 325
The entry list view 326
The form view 326
Tying up URLs and views 328
Writing the templates 329
The future of web development 336
Writing a Flask view 336
Building a JSON quote server in Falcon 338
Summary 340
Chapter 11: Debugging and Troubleshooting 341
Debugging techniques 342
Debugging with print 342
Debugging with a custom function 343
Inspecting the traceback 345
Using the Python debugger 348
Inspecting log files 351
Other techniques 353
Profiling 354
Assertions 354
Where to find information 354
Troubleshooting guidelines 355
Using console editors 355
Where to inspect 355
Using tests to debug 356
Monitoring 356
Summary 356
Chapter 12: Summing Up – A Complete Example 357
The challenge 357
Our implementation 358
Implementing the Django interface 358
The setup 358
The model layer 360
A simple form 364
The view layer 364
Imports and home view 364
Listing all records 365
Creating records 365
Updating records 367
Deleting records 369
Setting up the URLs 369
The template layer 370
Home and footer templates 372
Listing all records 372
Creating and editing records 377
Talking to the API 379
Deleting records 383
Implementing the Falcon API 385
The main application 385
Writing the helpers 386
Coding the password validator 387
Coding the password generator 390
Writing the handlers 391
Coding the password validator handler 392
Coding the password generator handler 393
Running the API 394
Testing the API 395
Testing the helpers 395
Testing the handlers 400
Where do you go from here? 402
Summary 403
Index 405

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drive into python

Drive into Python Programming in Deep by Mark Pilgrim

Drive Into Python is an Book which is written by Mark Pilgrim, This book contains 328 Pages and deep learning of python programming

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Whether you’re an experienced programmer looking to get into Python or grizzled Python veteran who remembers the days when you had to import the string module, Dive Into Python is your ‘desert island’ Python book.

Dive Into Python   1
Chapter 1 Installing Python   2
11 Which Python is right for you?    2
12 Python on Windows   2
13 Python on Mac OS X   3
14 Python on Mac OS 9   5
15 Python on RedHat Linux   5
16 Python on Debian GNU/Linux  6
17 Python Installation from Source  6
18 The Interactive Shell   7
19 Summary  8
Chapter 2 Your First Python Program   9
21 Diving in   9
22 Declaring Functions  9
23 Documenting Functions    10
24 Everything Is an Object   11
25 Indenting Code   13
26 Testing Modules   14
Chapter 3 Native Datatypes   15
31 Introducing Dictionaries   15
32 Introducing Lists   17
33 Introducing Tuples   22
34 Declaring variables   23
35 Formatting Strings   25
36 Mapping Lists   26
37 Joining Lists and Splitting Strings   28
38 Summary   29
Chapter 4 The Power Of Introspection   31
41 Diving In   31
42 Using Optional and Named Arguments   32
43 Using type, str, dir, and Other Built−In Functions   33
44 Getting Object References With getattr   36
45 Filtering Lists  38
46 The Peculiar Nature of and and or   39
47 Using lambda Functions   41
48 Putting It All Together   43
49 Summary   45
Chapter 5 Objects and Object−Orientation   47
51 Diving In   47
52 Importing Modules Using from module import   49
53 Defining Classes   50
54 Instantiating Classes   53
55 Exploring UserDict: A Wrapper Class   54
56 Special Class Methods   56
57 Advanced Special Class Methods   59
Chapter 5 Objects and Object−Orientation
58 Introducing Class Attributes   60
59 Private Functions   62
510 Summary   63
Chapter 6 Exceptions and File Handling   64
61 Handling Exceptions   64
62 Working with File Objects   66
63 Iterating with for Loops   70
64 Using sysmodules   72
65 Working with Directories   74
66 Putting It All Together   77
67 Summary   78
Chapter 7 Regular Expressions   81
71 Diving In   81
72 Case Study: Street Addresses   81
73 Case Study: Roman Numerals   83
74 Using the {n,m} Syntax   85
75 Verbose Regular Expressions   88
76 Case study: Parsing Phone Numbers   89
77 Summary   93
Chapter 8 HTML Processing   94
81 Diving in   94
82 Introducing sgmllibpy   98
83 Extracting data from HTML documents   100
84 Introducing BaseHTMLProcessorpy   102
85 locals and globals   104
86 Dictionary−based string formatting   107
87 Quoting attribute values   108
88 Introducing dialectpy   109
89 Putting it all together   111
810 Summary   113
Chapter 9 XML Processing   115
91 Diving in   115
92 Packages   121
93 Parsing XML   123
94 Unicode   125
95 Searching for elements   129
96 Accessing element attributes   131
97 Segue   132
Chapter 10 Scripts and Streams   133
101 Abstracting input sources    133
102 Standard input, output, and error    136
103 Caching node lookups   140
104 Finding direct children of a node   141
105 Creating separate handlers by node type   141
Chapter 10 Scripts and Streams
106 Handling command−line arguments   143
107 Putting it all together   146
108 Summary   148
Chapter 11 HTTP Web Services    149
111 Diving in   149
112 How not to fetch data over HTTP    151
113 Features of HTTP   152
114 Debugging HTTP web services   153
115 Setting the User−Agent   155
116 Handling Last−Modified and ETag   156
117 Handling redirects   159
118 Handling compressed data   163
119 Putting it all together   165
1110 Summary  167
Chapter 12 SOAP Web Services   168
121 Diving In   168
122 Installing the SOAP Libraries   169
123 First Steps with SOAP   171
124 Debugging SOAP Web Services   172
125 Introducing WSDL  173
126 Introspecting SOAP Web Services with WSDL   174
127 Searching Google   176
128 Troubleshooting SOAP Web Services   179
129 Summary   182
Chapter 13 Unit Testing183
131 Introduction to Roman numerals  183
132 Diving in   184
133 Introducing romantestpy  184
134 Testing for success   187
135 Testing for failure   189
136 Testing for sanity   190
Chapter 14 Test−First Programming   193
141 romanpy, stage 1   193
142 romanpy, stage 2   196
143 romanpy, stage 3   199
144 romanpy, stage 4   202
145 romanpy, stage 5   205
Chapter 15 Refactoring  208
151 Handling bugs  208
152 Handling changing requirements  210
153 Refactoring  216
154 Postscript  219
155 Summary  221
Chapter 16 Functional Programming223
161 Diving in   223
162 Finding the path  224
163 Filtering lists revisited  226
164 Mapping lists revisited  228
165 Data−centric programming  229
166 Dynamically importing modules  230
167 Putting it all together  231
168 Summary  234
Chapter 17 Dynamic functions  235
171 Diving in  235
172 pluralpy, stage 1  235
173 pluralpy, stage 2  237
174 pluralpy, stage 3  239
175 pluralpy, stage 4  240
176 pluralpy, stage 5  242
177 pluralpy, stage 6  243
178 Summary  246
Chapter 18 Performance Tuning  247
181 Diving in  247
182 Using the timeit Module  249
183 Optimizing Regular Expressions  250
184 Optimizing Dictionary Lookups  253
185 Optimizing List Operations  256
186 Optimizing String Manipulation  258
187 Summary  260
Appendix A Further reading  261
Appendix B A 5−minute review  268
Appendix C Tips and tricks  282
Appendix D List of examples  289
Appendix E Revision history  302
Appendix F About the book  314
Appendix G GNU Free Documentation License  315
G0 Preamble   315
G1 Applicability and definitions  315
G2 Verbatim copying  316
G3 Copying in quantity  316
G4 Modifications  317
G5 Combining documents  318
G6 Collections of documents  318
G7 Aggregation with independent works  318
Appendix G GNU Free Documentation License
G8 Translation  318
G9 Termination  319
G10 Future revisions of this license  319
G11 How to use this License for your documents  319
Appendix H Python license 320
HA History of the software 320
HB Terms and conditions for accessing or otherwise using Python  320

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Networking for Dummies

Networking for Dummies 421 Pages Book for Free

Introduction Networking for Dummies this book has 421 pages and its completely free. Books written by Doug Lowe  – A Wiley Brand.  11th Edition.

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Part 1: Getting Started with Networking. 5

CHAPTER 1: Let’s Network!. 7
CHAPTER 2: Life on the Network. 19
CHAPTER 3: More Ways to Use Your Network . 39

Part 2: Setting Up a Network. 55

CHAPTER 4: Planning a Network. 57
CHAPTER 5: Dealing with TCP/IP. 69
CHAPTER 6: Oh, What a Tangled Web We Weave: Cables, Switches, and Routers. 95
CHAPTER 7: Configuring Windows Clients. 113
CHAPTER 8: Connecting Your Network to the Internet. 123
CHAPTER 9: Setting Up a Wireless Network. .131
CHAPTER 10: Virtual Networking. 151

Part 3: Working with Servers. 177

CHAPTER 11: Setting Up a Server. 179
CHAPTER 12: Managing Windows User Accounts. 191
CHAPTER 13: Managing Network Storage . 207
CHAPTER 14: Managing Exchange Server 2016. 223
CHAPTER 15: Creating an Intranet. 237

Part 4: Managing and Protecting Your Network. 251

CHAPTER 16: Welcome to Network Management . 253
CHAPTER 17: Solving Network Problems. 263
CHAPTER 18: Backing Up Your Data . 281
CHAPTER 19: Securing Your Network. 295
CHAPTER 20: Hardening Your Network . 311
CHAPTER 21: Network Performance Anxiety . 323

Part 5: More Ways to Network. 335

CHAPTER 22: Life in Cloud City. 337
CHAPTER 23: Managing Mobile Devices. 347
CHAPTER 24: Connecting from Home. 361
0002724121.INDD iv April 27, 2016 5:00 AM

Part 6: Networking Beyond Windows. 369

CHAPTER 25: Networking with Linux. 371
CHAPTER 26: Mac Networking. 393

Part 7: The Part of Tens. 403

CHAPTER 27: Ten Networking Commandments. 405
CHAPTER 28: Ten Big Network Mistakes. 409
CHAPTER 29: Ten Things You Should Keep in Your Closet . 417

Index. 421

Networking for Dummies

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