python cook book

Python Cook Book Written by Sebastian

Author: Sebastian

Python Cook Book Index

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CSV Reader / Writer Example 1
1.1 The Basics . 1
1.2 Reading and writing dictionaries . 5
1.3 Download the Code Project . . . . 6
2 Decorator Tutorial 7
2.1 Understanding Functions . . . . . 7
2.2 Jumping into decorators 8
2.3 The Practice 9
2.4 Download the Code Project . . . . 14
3 Threading / Concurrency Example 15
3.1 Python _thread module 15
3.2 Python threading module . . . . . 16
3.2.1 Extending Thread . . . . . 16
3.2.2 Getting Current Thread Information . 17
3.2.3 Daemon Threads . . . . . 18
3.2.4 Joining Threads 20
3.2.5 Time Threads . 22
3.2.6 Events: Communication Between Threads . . . . 23
3.2.7 Locking Resources . . . . 24
3.2.8 Limiting Concurrent Access to Resources . . . . 29
3.2.9 Thread-Specific Data . . . 29
4 Logging Example 31
4.1 The Theory 31
4.1.1 Log Levels . . 31
4.1.2 Handlers . . . 32
4.1.3 Format . . . . 32
4.2 The Practice 33
4.3 Download the Code Project . . . . 39

Python Programming Cookbook iii
5 Django Tutorial 40
5.1 Creating the project . . 40
5.2 Creating our application . . . . . 40
5.3 Database Setup . . . . 41
5.4 The Public Page . . . . 45
5.5 Style Sheets 47
5.6 Download the Code Project . . . . 49
6 Dictionary Example 50
6.1 Define . . . 50
6.2 Read . . . . 50
6.3 Write . . . 52
6.4 Useful operations . . . 52
6.4.1 In (keyword) . 53
6.4.2 Len (built-in function) . . 53
6.4.3 keys() and values() . . . . 54
6.4.4 items() . . . . 55
6.4.5 update() . . . . 56
6.4.6 copy() . . . . . 56
6.5 Download the Code Project . . . . 57
7 Sockets Example 58
7.1 Creating a Socket . . . 58
7.2 Using a Socket . . . . 59
7.3 Disconnecting . . . . . 60
7.4 A Little Example Here 60
7.5 Non-blocking Sockets . 62
7.6 Download the Code Project . . . . 63
8 Map Example 64
8.1 Map Implementation . 64
8.2 Python’s Map . . . . . 65
8.3 Map Object 68
8.4 Download the Code Project . . . . 69
9 Subprocess Example 70
9.1 Convenience Functions 70
9.1.1 subprocess.call 70
9.1.2 subprocess.check_call . . 71
9.1.3 subprocess.check_output . 72
9.2 Popen . . . 72
9.3 Download the Code Project . . . . 74

Python Programming Cookbook iv
10 Send Email Example 75
10.1 The Basics of smtplib . 75
10.2 SSL and Authentication 76
10.3 Sending HTML . . . . 77
10.4 Sending Attachments . 78
10.5 Download the Code Project . . . . 80

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Learn Python

Learn Python Book Written by Fabrizio Romano

Author: Fabrizio Romano
Reviewers: Simone Burol,Julio Vicente,Trigo Guijarro,Veit Heller
Commissioning Editor: Akram Hussain
Acquisition Editor: Indrajit Das
Content Development Editors: Samantha Gonsalves,Adrian Raposo
Technical Editor: Siddhi Rane
Copy Editors:Janbal Dharmaraj,Kevin McGowan
Project Coordinator: Kinjal Bari
Proofreader: Safis Editing
Indexer: Priya Sane
Graphics: Kirk D’Penha, Abhinash Sahu
Production Coordinator: Melwyn D’sa
Cover Work: Melwyn D’sa

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Chapter 1: Introduction and First Steps – Take a Deep Breath 1
A proper introduction 2
Enter the Python 4
About Python 5
Portability 5
Coherence 5
Developer productivity 6
An extensive library 6
Software quality 6
Software integration 6
Satisfaction and enjoyment 7
What are the drawbacks? 7
Who is using Python today? 8
Setting up the environment 8
Python 2 versus Python 3 – the great debate 8
Installing Python 9
Setting up the Python interpreter 10
About virtualenv 12
Your first virtual environment 14
Your friend, the console 17
How you can run a Python program 17
Running Python scripts 18
Running the Python interactive shell 18
Running Python as a service 20
Running Python as a GUI application 20
How is Python code organized 21
How do we use modules and packages 22
Python’s execution model 25
Names and namespaces 25
Scopes 27
Object and classes 30
Guidelines on how to write good code 33
The Python culture 34
A note on the IDEs 35
Summary 36
Chapter 2: Built-in Data Types 37
Everything is an object 37
Mutable or immutable? That is the question 38
Numbers 40
Integers 40
Booleans 42
Reals 43
Complex numbers 44
Fractions and decimals 45
Immutable sequences 46
Strings and bytes 46
Encoding and decoding strings 47
Indexing and slicing strings 48
Tuples 49
Mutable sequences 50
Lists 50
Byte arrays 54
Set types 55
Mapping types – dictionaries 57
The collections module 62
Named tuples 62
Defaultdict 64
ChainMap 65
Final considerations 66
Small values caching 66
How to choose data structures 67
About indexing and slicing 68
About the names 70
Summary 70
Chapter 3: Iterating and Making Decisions 73
Conditional programming 74
A specialized else: elif 75
The ternary operator 77
Looping 78
The for loop 78
Iterating over a range 79
Iterating over a sequence 80
Iterators and iterables 81
Iterating over multiple sequences 83
The while loop 85
The break and continue statements 88
A special else clause 90
Putting this all together 91
Example 1 – a prime generator 92
Example 2 – applying discounts 94
A quick peek at the itertools module 97
Infinite iterators 98
Iterators terminating on the shortest input sequence 98
Combinatoric generators 99
Summary 100
Chapter 4: Functions, the Building Blocks of Code 101
Why use functions? 102
Reduce code duplication 103
Splitting a complex task 103
Hide implementation details 104
Improve readability 105
Improve traceability 106
Scopes and name resolution 107
The global and nonlocal statements 108
Input parameters 110
Argument passing 111
Assignment to argument names don’t affect the caller 112
Changing a mutable affects the caller 112
How to specify input parameters 113
Positional arguments 113
Keyword arguments and default values 114
Variable positional arguments 115
Variable keyword arguments 116
Keyword-only arguments 117
Combining input parameters 118
Avoid the trap! Mutable defaults 120
Return values 121
Returning multiple values 123
A few useful tips 124
Recursive functions 125
Anonymous functions 126
Function attributes 127
Built-in functions 128
One final example 129
Documenting your code 130
Importing objects 131
Relative imports 133
Summary 134
Chapter 5: Saving Time and Memory 135
map, zip, and filter 137
map 137
zip 140
filter 141
Comprehensions 142
Nested comprehensions 143
Filtering a comprehension 144
dict comprehensions 146
set comprehensions 147
Generators 148
Generator functions 148
Going beyond next 151
The yield from expression 155
Generator expressions 156
Some performance considerations 159
Don’t overdo comprehensions and generators 162
Name localization 167
Generation behavior in built-ins 168
One last example 169
Summary 171
Chapter 6: Advanced Concepts – OOP, Decorators and Iterators 173
Decorators 173
A decorator factory 180
Object-oriented programming 182
The simplest Python class 182
Class and object namespaces 183
Attribute shadowing 184
I, me, and myself – using the self variable 186
Initializing an instance 187
OOP is about code reuse 187
Inheritance and composition 188
Accessing a base class 192
Multiple inheritance 194
Method resolution order 197
Static and class methods 200
Static methods 200
Class methods 202
Private methods and name mangling 204
The property decorator 206
Operator overloading 208
Polymorphism – a brief overview 209
Writing a custom iterator 210
Summary 211
Chapter 7: Testing, Profiling, and Dealing with Exceptions 213
Testing your application 214
The anatomy of a test 216
Testing guidelines 217
Unit testing 218
Writing a unit test 219
Mock objects and patching 220
Assertions 221
A classic unit test example 221
Making a test fail 224
Interface testing 225
Comparing tests with and without mocks 225
Boundaries and granularity 228
A more interesting example 229
Test-driven development 233
Exceptions 235
Profiling Python 241
When to profile? 244
Summary 245
Chapter 8: The Edges – GUIs and Scripts 247
First approach – scripting 250
The imports 250
Parsing arguments 251
The business logic 253
Second approach – a GUI application 258
The imports 260
The layout logic 261
The business logic 265
Fetching the web page 265
Saving the images 267
Alerting the user 271
How to improve the application? 272
Where do we go from here? 273
The tkinter.tix module 273
The turtle module 274
wxPython, PyQt, and PyGTK 274
The principle of least astonishment 275
Threading considerations 275
Summary 276
Chapter 9: Data Science 277
IPython and Jupyter notebook 278
Dealing with data 281
Setting up the notebook 282
Preparing the data 283
Cleaning the data 287
Creating the DataFrame 289
Unpacking the campaign name 291
Unpacking the user data 293
Cleaning everything up 297
Saving the DataFrame to a file 298
Visualizing the results 299
Where do we go from here? 307
Summary 308
Chapter 10: Web Development Done Right 309
What is the Web? 309
How does the Web work? 310
The Django web framework 311
Django design philosophy 311
The model layer 312
The view layer 312
The template layer 313
The Django URL dispatcher 313
Regular expressions 314
A regex website 314
Setting up Django 315
Starting the project 315
Creating users 317
Adding the Entry model 318
Customizing the admin panel 320
Creating the form 322
Writing the views 323
The home view 325
The entry list view 326
The form view 326
Tying up URLs and views 328
Writing the templates 329
The future of web development 336
Writing a Flask view 336
Building a JSON quote server in Falcon 338
Summary 340
Chapter 11: Debugging and Troubleshooting 341
Debugging techniques 342
Debugging with print 342
Debugging with a custom function 343
Inspecting the traceback 345
Using the Python debugger 348
Inspecting log files 351
Other techniques 353
Profiling 354
Assertions 354
Where to find information 354
Troubleshooting guidelines 355
Using console editors 355
Where to inspect 355
Using tests to debug 356
Monitoring 356
Summary 356
Chapter 12: Summing Up – A Complete Example 357
The challenge 357
Our implementation 358
Implementing the Django interface 358
The setup 358
The model layer 360
A simple form 364
The view layer 364
Imports and home view 364
Listing all records 365
Creating records 365
Updating records 367
Deleting records 369
Setting up the URLs 369
The template layer 370
Home and footer templates 372
Listing all records 372
Creating and editing records 377
Talking to the API 379
Deleting records 383
Implementing the Falcon API 385
The main application 385
Writing the helpers 386
Coding the password validator 387
Coding the password generator 390
Writing the handlers 391
Coding the password validator handler 392
Coding the password generator handler 393
Running the API 394
Testing the API 395
Testing the helpers 395
Testing the handlers 400
Where do you go from here? 402
Summary 403
Index 405

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drive into python

Drive into Python Programming in Deep by Mark Pilgrim

Drive Into Python is an Book which is written by Mark Pilgrim, This book contains 328 Pages and deep learning of python programming

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Whether you’re an experienced programmer looking to get into Python or grizzled Python veteran who remembers the days when you had to import the string module, Dive Into Python is your ‘desert island’ Python book.

Dive Into Python   1
Chapter 1 Installing Python   2
11 Which Python is right for you?    2
12 Python on Windows   2
13 Python on Mac OS X   3
14 Python on Mac OS 9   5
15 Python on RedHat Linux   5
16 Python on Debian GNU/Linux  6
17 Python Installation from Source  6
18 The Interactive Shell   7
19 Summary  8
Chapter 2 Your First Python Program   9
21 Diving in   9
22 Declaring Functions  9
23 Documenting Functions    10
24 Everything Is an Object   11
25 Indenting Code   13
26 Testing Modules   14
Chapter 3 Native Datatypes   15
31 Introducing Dictionaries   15
32 Introducing Lists   17
33 Introducing Tuples   22
34 Declaring variables   23
35 Formatting Strings   25
36 Mapping Lists   26
37 Joining Lists and Splitting Strings   28
38 Summary   29
Chapter 4 The Power Of Introspection   31
41 Diving In   31
42 Using Optional and Named Arguments   32
43 Using type, str, dir, and Other Built−In Functions   33
44 Getting Object References With getattr   36
45 Filtering Lists  38
46 The Peculiar Nature of and and or   39
47 Using lambda Functions   41
48 Putting It All Together   43
49 Summary   45
Chapter 5 Objects and Object−Orientation   47
51 Diving In   47
52 Importing Modules Using from module import   49
53 Defining Classes   50
54 Instantiating Classes   53
55 Exploring UserDict: A Wrapper Class   54
56 Special Class Methods   56
57 Advanced Special Class Methods   59
Chapter 5 Objects and Object−Orientation
58 Introducing Class Attributes   60
59 Private Functions   62
510 Summary   63
Chapter 6 Exceptions and File Handling   64
61 Handling Exceptions   64
62 Working with File Objects   66
63 Iterating with for Loops   70
64 Using sysmodules   72
65 Working with Directories   74
66 Putting It All Together   77
67 Summary   78
Chapter 7 Regular Expressions   81
71 Diving In   81
72 Case Study: Street Addresses   81
73 Case Study: Roman Numerals   83
74 Using the {n,m} Syntax   85
75 Verbose Regular Expressions   88
76 Case study: Parsing Phone Numbers   89
77 Summary   93
Chapter 8 HTML Processing   94
81 Diving in   94
82 Introducing sgmllibpy   98
83 Extracting data from HTML documents   100
84 Introducing BaseHTMLProcessorpy   102
85 locals and globals   104
86 Dictionary−based string formatting   107
87 Quoting attribute values   108
88 Introducing dialectpy   109
89 Putting it all together   111
810 Summary   113
Chapter 9 XML Processing   115
91 Diving in   115
92 Packages   121
93 Parsing XML   123
94 Unicode   125
95 Searching for elements   129
96 Accessing element attributes   131
97 Segue   132
Chapter 10 Scripts and Streams   133
101 Abstracting input sources    133
102 Standard input, output, and error    136
103 Caching node lookups   140
104 Finding direct children of a node   141
105 Creating separate handlers by node type   141
Chapter 10 Scripts and Streams
106 Handling command−line arguments   143
107 Putting it all together   146
108 Summary   148
Chapter 11 HTTP Web Services    149
111 Diving in   149
112 How not to fetch data over HTTP    151
113 Features of HTTP   152
114 Debugging HTTP web services   153
115 Setting the User−Agent   155
116 Handling Last−Modified and ETag   156
117 Handling redirects   159
118 Handling compressed data   163
119 Putting it all together   165
1110 Summary  167
Chapter 12 SOAP Web Services   168
121 Diving In   168
122 Installing the SOAP Libraries   169
123 First Steps with SOAP   171
124 Debugging SOAP Web Services   172
125 Introducing WSDL  173
126 Introspecting SOAP Web Services with WSDL   174
127 Searching Google   176
128 Troubleshooting SOAP Web Services   179
129 Summary   182
Chapter 13 Unit Testing183
131 Introduction to Roman numerals  183
132 Diving in   184
133 Introducing romantestpy  184
134 Testing for success   187
135 Testing for failure   189
136 Testing for sanity   190
Chapter 14 Test−First Programming   193
141 romanpy, stage 1   193
142 romanpy, stage 2   196
143 romanpy, stage 3   199
144 romanpy, stage 4   202
145 romanpy, stage 5   205
Chapter 15 Refactoring  208
151 Handling bugs  208
152 Handling changing requirements  210
153 Refactoring  216
154 Postscript  219
155 Summary  221
Chapter 16 Functional Programming223
161 Diving in   223
162 Finding the path  224
163 Filtering lists revisited  226
164 Mapping lists revisited  228
165 Data−centric programming  229
166 Dynamically importing modules  230
167 Putting it all together  231
168 Summary  234
Chapter 17 Dynamic functions  235
171 Diving in  235
172 pluralpy, stage 1  235
173 pluralpy, stage 2  237
174 pluralpy, stage 3  239
175 pluralpy, stage 4  240
176 pluralpy, stage 5  242
177 pluralpy, stage 6  243
178 Summary  246
Chapter 18 Performance Tuning  247
181 Diving in  247
182 Using the timeit Module  249
183 Optimizing Regular Expressions  250
184 Optimizing Dictionary Lookups  253
185 Optimizing List Operations  256
186 Optimizing String Manipulation  258
187 Summary  260
Appendix A Further reading  261
Appendix B A 5−minute review  268
Appendix C Tips and tricks  282
Appendix D List of examples  289
Appendix E Revision history  302
Appendix F About the book  314
Appendix G GNU Free Documentation License  315
G0 Preamble   315
G1 Applicability and definitions  315
G2 Verbatim copying  316
G3 Copying in quantity  316
G4 Modifications  317
G5 Combining documents  318
G6 Collections of documents  318
G7 Aggregation with independent works  318
Appendix G GNU Free Documentation License
G8 Translation  318
G9 Termination  319
G10 Future revisions of this license  319
G11 How to use this License for your documents  319
Appendix H Python license 320
HA History of the software 320
HB Terms and conditions for accessing or otherwise using Python  320

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Networking for Dummies

Networking for Dummies 421 Pages Book for Free

Introduction Networking for Dummies this book has 421 pages and its completely free. Books written by Doug Lowe  – A Wiley Brand.  11th Edition.

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Part 1: Getting Started with Networking. 5

CHAPTER 1: Let’s Network!. 7
CHAPTER 2: Life on the Network. 19
CHAPTER 3: More Ways to Use Your Network . 39

Part 2: Setting Up a Network. 55

CHAPTER 4: Planning a Network. 57
CHAPTER 5: Dealing with TCP/IP. 69
CHAPTER 6: Oh, What a Tangled Web We Weave: Cables, Switches, and Routers. 95
CHAPTER 7: Configuring Windows Clients. 113
CHAPTER 8: Connecting Your Network to the Internet. 123
CHAPTER 9: Setting Up a Wireless Network. .131
CHAPTER 10: Virtual Networking. 151

Part 3: Working with Servers. 177

CHAPTER 11: Setting Up a Server. 179
CHAPTER 12: Managing Windows User Accounts. 191
CHAPTER 13: Managing Network Storage . 207
CHAPTER 14: Managing Exchange Server 2016. 223
CHAPTER 15: Creating an Intranet. 237

Part 4: Managing and Protecting Your Network. 251

CHAPTER 16: Welcome to Network Management . 253
CHAPTER 17: Solving Network Problems. 263
CHAPTER 18: Backing Up Your Data . 281
CHAPTER 19: Securing Your Network. 295
CHAPTER 20: Hardening Your Network . 311
CHAPTER 21: Network Performance Anxiety . 323

Part 5: More Ways to Network. 335

CHAPTER 22: Life in Cloud City. 337
CHAPTER 23: Managing Mobile Devices. 347
CHAPTER 24: Connecting from Home. 361
0002724121.INDD iv April 27, 2016 5:00 AM

Part 6: Networking Beyond Windows. 369

CHAPTER 25: Networking with Linux. 371
CHAPTER 26: Mac Networking. 393

Part 7: The Part of Tens. 403

CHAPTER 27: Ten Networking Commandments. 405
CHAPTER 28: Ten Big Network Mistakes. 409
CHAPTER 29: Ten Things You Should Keep in Your Closet . 417

Index. 421

Networking for Dummies

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dark web and bitcoin book

Dark Web & BitCoin Global Terrorism Threat Assessment

Dark Web & BitCoin Global Terrorism Threat Assessment

Table of Contents
1. Executive Summary …………………………………………………………………………… 4
2. Dark Web …………………………………………………………………………………………. 5
2.1. Problems for the Intelligence Community …………………………………………………. 5
2.1.1. Frequent Changes in Addresses and no Search Engines …………………………………………………….. 5
2.1.2. Anonymous and Encrypted Communication Services ……………………………………………………..6
2.1.3. Anonymous and Untraceable Telephony ……………………………………………………………………………7
2.1.4. Other Means of Anonymous and Untraceable Communication ………………………………………….7
3. Bitcoin …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9
3.1. Technical Explanation ……………………………………………………………………………. 9
3.2. Problems for the Intelligence Community ……………………………………………….. 10
3.2.1. No Controlling Instances ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10
3.2.2. Assets cannot be Frozen or otherwise Seized …………………………………………………………………….11
3.2.3. Bitcoin can be “Laundered” ……………………………………………………………………………………………….11
3.2.4. Empowers untraceable Funding for (Cyber-)terrorism ………………………………………………………12
3.2.5. Allows an absolutely uncontrollable Black Market ……………………………………………………………. 13
3.2.6. Enables absolutely plausible deniability of foreign Governments and Institutions for
involvement in ‘Cyber-Attacks’ ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 14
4. Examples of Crimes currently being committed …………………………………… 14
4.1. Terrorism …………………………………………………………………………………………… 15
4.2. Financial Fraud …………………………………………………………………………………… 16
4.3. Money Laundering of Conventional Currency …………………………………………… 17
4.4. Superior Counterfeits (Documents and Money) ………………………………………… 17
4.5. International Drug Trade ………………………………………………………………………. 18
4.6. Arms Trade …………………………………………………………………………………………. 18
4.7. Child (and other illegal) Pornography …………………………………………………….. 19
4.8. Extortion (of Law Enforcement Personnel) ………………………………………………. 20
4.9. Contract Murder ………………………………………………………………………………….. 20
4.10. Human Trials …………………………………………………………………………………….. 21
4.11. Human Trafficking …………………………………………………………………………….. 22
4.12. Content Piracy …………………………………………………………………………………… 22
5. Conclusions ……………………………………………………………………………………. 23

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5 Search Engine Optimization Books

5 Search Engine Optimization Books You Must Read

5 Search Engine Optimization Books you Must read because to learn SEO and Earn with SEO.

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So, here are the basics you need to know:

  • There are 2 kinds of SEO, onsite and offsite. Onsite is doing
    improvements on your site (like appropriate meta descriptions on each
    page) and offsite is acquiring links from other sites towards your site.
  • Onsite brings roughly 20% of the results and offsite 80% of them.
  • Always start fixing quick onsite issues, because they are usually quick
    to fix and they will give you some quick wins. Also, they will amplify your
    offsite efforts.
  • After you have fixed them, move on to offsite SEO. The best way to do
    that is by hiring a skillful agency. It always outperforms individual inhouse
    hires and costs less. If you want a recommendation let me know.

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Book#2 SEO

As “Wizard of Moz” Rand Fishkin reminded us during his popular SEO presentation at Content Marketing World 2015, search engines are constantly evolving their algorithms to enhance their ability to serve consumers’ needs. And while current systems are highly proficient at classifying the terms of a search query, calculating its likely intent, and ranking potential results in terms of their relevance, the search engine of tomorrow will likely use more advanced methods of mapping (and manipulating) the mechanics of meaning.

What does all this mean for marketers? And, more importantly, what should you be doing now to prepare your content for the rise of sentient SEO?

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Book#3 SEO

You may not be able to control how many people choose to share your content, but there are many ways to secure attention from the search engines by following the basics of on-page SEO. These time-honored traditions have been proven effective, despite whatever trends come and go.

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8 Stupid Simple Social Media Tricks to Boost SEO

It’s tempting to view social media and SEO as two separate entities, but in our experience these two elements of digital marketing are interwoven. Using appropriate search terms in your social media posts helps users find your most relevant content and clearly spells out what’s being offered. In turn, social media shares greatly benefit your search engine visibility in many ways. Use this guide to help you quickly and easily boost your SEO.

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The Marketing Agency Blueprint: The Handbook for Building Hybrid PR, SEO, Content, Advertising, and Web Firms

The marketing services industry is on the cusp of a truly transformational period. The old guard, rooted in tradition and resistant to change, will fall and new leaders will emerge. Hybrid marketing agencies that are more nimble, tech savvy, and collaborative will redefine the industry. Digital services will be engrained into the DNA and blended with traditional methods for integrated campaigns. The depth, versatility, and drive of their talent will be the cornerstones of organizations that pursue a higher purpose. The Marketing Agency Blueprint is a practical and candid guide that presents ten rules for building such a hybrid agency.

The new marketing agency model will create and nurture diverse recurring revenue streams through a mix of services, consulting, training, education, publishing, and software sales. It will use efficiency and productivity, not billable hours, as the essential drivers of profitability. Its value and success will be measured by outcomes, not outputs. Its strength and stability will depend on a willingness to be in a perpetual state of change, and an ability to execute and adapt faster than competitors. The Marketing Agency Blueprint demonstrates how to:

  • Generate more qualified leads, win clients with set pricing and service packages, and secure more long-term retainers
  • Develop highly efficient management systems and more effective account teams
  • Deliver greater results and value to clients

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VCP6

VCP6-DTM STUDY GUIDE VMWARE CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL

VCP6-DTM Study Guide (VMware Certified Professional -Desktop and Mobility)

https://arkit-in.tradepub.com/free/w_vlad05/

VCP6

VCP6-DTM Objective 1.1 – Describe and differentiate between component functions and features 3
VCP6-DTM Objective 1.2 – Install Horizon (with View) Composer Server 7
VCP6-DTM Objective 1.3 – Install Horizon (with View) Connection Server 16
VCP6-DTM Objective 1.4 – Install Horizon (with View) Security Server 21
VCP6-DTM Objective 1.5 – Prepare Environment for Horizon (with View) 26
VCP6-DTM Objective 1.6 – Install, Configure and Manage vRealize Operations Manager For Horizon 35
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.1 – Configure Horizon (with View) Composer 45
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.2  Configure Horizon (with View) 52
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.3 – Configure PCoIP/RDP Protocol Settings 68
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.4 – Configure and Manage Security in Horizon (with View) 77
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.5 – Create ThinApp applications and a ThinApp repository 85
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.6 – Configure Horizon View Cloud Pod Architecture 96
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.1 – Configure Automated Pools using linked clones 104
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.2 – Configure Automated Pools using full clones 115
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.3 – Configure Manual Pools 125
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.3 – Configure Manual Pools 125
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.4 – Build and Customize Desktop Images 129
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.5 – Configure RDSH (Remote Desktop Session Host) Application Pools 135
VCP6-DTM Objective 4.1 – Troubleshoot Desktop Imaging Issues 143
VCP6-DTM Objective 4.2 – Troubleshoot Account and Permissions 146
VCP6-DTM Objective 4.3 – Troubleshoot connectivity between Horizon (with View) components 152
VCP6-DTM Objective 4.4 – Troubleshoot PCoIP Configuration 157
VCP6-DTM Objective 5.1 – Install and Configure VMware Mirage Components 162
VCP6-DTM Objective 5.2 – Manage Layers 183
VCP6-DTM Objective 5.3 – Manage Endpoints 191
VCP6-DTM Objective 6.1 – Install VMware Workspace Portal 203
VCP6-DTM Objective 6.2 – Configure VMware Workspace Portal 207
VCP6-DTM Objective 6.3 – Manage VMware Workspace Portal 214

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5 Books for Learning VMWARE Virtualization be an Expe

VCP6-DTM Study Guide (VMware Certified Professional -Desktop and Mobility)

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VCP6

VCP6-DTM Objective 1.1 – Describe and differentiate between component functions and features 3
VCP6-DTM Objective 1.2 – Install Horizon (with View) Composer Server 7
VCP6-DTM Objective 1.3 – Install Horizon (with View) Connection Server 16
VCP6-DTM Objective 1.4 – Install Horizon (with View) Security Server 21
VCP6-DTM Objective 1.5 – Prepare Environment for Horizon (with View) 26
VCP6-DTM Objective 1.6 – Install, Configure and Manage vRealize Operations Manager For Horizon 35
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.1 – Configure Horizon (with View) Composer 45
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.2  Configure Horizon (with View) 52
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.3 – Configure PCoIP/RDP Protocol Settings 68
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.4 – Configure and Manage Security in Horizon (with View) 77
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.5 – Create ThinApp applications and a ThinApp repository 85
VCP6-DTM Objective 2.6 – Configure Horizon View Cloud Pod Architecture 96
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.1 – Configure Automated Pools using linked clones 104
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.2 – Configure Automated Pools using full clones 115
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.3 – Configure Manual Pools 125
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.3 – Configure Manual Pools 125
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.4 – Build and Customize Desktop Images 129
VCP6-DTM Objective 3.5 – Configure RDSH (Remote Desktop Session Host) Application Pools 135
VCP6-DTM Objective 4.1 – Troubleshoot Desktop Imaging Issues 143
VCP6-DTM Objective 4.2 – Troubleshoot Account and Permissions 146
VCP6-DTM Objective 4.3 – Troubleshoot connectivity between Horizon (with View) components 152
VCP6-DTM Objective 4.4 – Troubleshoot PCoIP Configuration 157
VCP6-DTM Objective 5.1 – Install and Configure VMware Mirage Components 162
VCP6-DTM Objective 5.2 – Manage Layers 183
VCP6-DTM Objective 5.3 – Manage Endpoints 191
VCP6-DTM Objective 6.1 – Install VMware Workspace Portal 203
VCP6-DTM Objective 6.2 – Configure VMware Workspace Portal 207
VCP6-DTM Objective 6.3 – Manage VMware Workspace Portal 214

Download the Book Now

This e-book is destined to every VMware fan and/or IT professional and enthusiast.

https://arkit-in.tradepub.com/free/w_vlad04/

How to setup VMware vSphere Lab in VMware Workstation

This Free E-book describes the setup of Portable Lab to run nested ESXi hosts with nested VMs, shared storage, virtual networking etc… This is no mean to be a perfect, without errors, guide. But it’s a guide which is available for Free, as is. And it is a detailed, step-by-step guide. There aren’t many around. I’ll try to update this e-book as the VMware products evolve….

Almost everyone has one powerful machine, PC, at home to work with, but not everyone can afford to buy 2 white boxes or small servers PLUS a NAS box which does shared hosting. And then you still need 4th box to access all this.

While people run mostly their physical labs at home with whiteboxes, real servers, real NAS and/or SAN boxes, there is still place for a lab designed to run in VMware Workstation. An ultimate VMware vSphere lab running in VMware Workstation with nested ESXi servers and few cloned VMs. That’s quite a challenge to design it and built it.
Sure, physical lab gets better performance, but portable lab is… portable. You can take it with you while traveling, while on the boat, or train.
There are several possibilities for the design, especially for “shared storage” where the nested VMs live (the second level nested VMs)…. I will try to save as much on the storage space here. There are many different ways on how to design that part also.
To make it easier to build, not many guides are available which walks you step-by-step, especially when it comes to the network design and also to get the best available “tweaks” to save every single gigabit of storage, since this solution must obviously run on SSD storage.

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Scaling Storage for VMware Virtualized Environments

Virtualization requires storage to scale, and the easiest way to scale is by using a building block approach to adding performance and capacity.

https://arkit-in.tradepub.com/free/w_aaaa3008/

Scaling Storage for VMware Virtualized Environments

Traditional storage systems designed before the advent of virtualization are difficult to administer and scale as an enterprise’s virtualization storage needs change. TintriVM store and Tintri Global Center offer IT organizations the best choice for building and scaling virtualized environments. VMstore is the industry’s leading storage solution designed for virtualized environments, and Tintri Global Center adds the visibility and control to enable all VMstore systems to function as one. This winning combination of intelligent storage and deep insight makes Tintri the best choice for simply and predictably scaling storage in virtualized environments.

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Building a Home Lab for VMware vSphere 6.0

Learn how to (relatively) inexpensively setup a simulated lab environment using the latest version of VMware.

vmware vsphere

vmware vsphere

This paper will discuss how to (relatively) inexpensively setup a simulated lab environment using VMware (the latest version). This white paper is broken down into three major sections; the first and most detailed is about the hardware required, the second is about the VMware Workstation configuration, and the third is about installing vSphere (ESXi) 6.0 and Virtual Center (VC).

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Deploying IBM® Storwize® V7000 in VMware Environments

IBM® System Storage® virtualization technologies enable clients to virtualize more systems, faster and with less storage than traditional legacy storage architectures.

This paper provides insight into the value proposition of the IBM® Storwize® V7000 for a VMware environment to increase the storage utilization, availability and overall reduction of costs. It outlines a plan for the configuration, setup, and management of the environment.

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Windows Server 2012

70-410 – Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012

The Microsoft 70-410 exam is part one of a series of three exams that test the skills and knowledge necessary to implement a core Windows Server 2012 infrastructure in an existing enterprise environment. Passing this exam validates a candidate’s ability to implement and configure Windows Server 2012 core services, such as Active Directory and the networking services. Passing this exam along with the other two exams confirms that a candidate has the skills and knowledge necessary for implementing, managing, maintaining, and provisioning services and infrastructure in a Windows Server 2012 environment. The Microsoft 70-410 CramMaster contains over 200 questions to test your skills and knowledge in preparation for the exam. Also included are Exam Quality Simulations to test your endurance for the upcoming exam.

The 70-410 – Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012 covers the following recommended objective categories:

  • Install and Configure Servers
  • Configure Server Roles and Features
  • Configure Hyper-V
  • Deploy and Configure Core Network Services
  • Install and Administer Active Directory
  • Create and Manage Group Policy

System Requirements – This exam prep software is a Windows based software download.

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A guide to machine learning

A Guide to Machine Learning

It takes an average 200+ days to detect a cyber breach while network data is quietly siphoned. Fear not, machine learning is here—the hot new cyber defense. Unfortunately, it is often misunderstood and harder yet to determine its effectiveness. Read this white paper to understand the two ways machines learn and how to measure their success at detecting unknown malware.

Two Ways To Learn

Machine learning is the process of computer programs becoming more accurate at a task due to exposure to data, called training instances. What task is being performed and what type of data is provided for training is critical to deciding how and what techniques to use in the machine learning process
The most important aspect of the data is whether it is “labeled”. Labeled means that someone has assigned a category of interest to each training instance. The best label is dependent on what task the machine learning program is seeking to accomplish. For example, if one wants a program to distinguish between cats and dogs labels of “cat” and “dog” are sufficient. If, however, one wishes to distinguish between breeds of cat or dog labels such as; Pug, Dalmatian, American Shorthair, Siamese, Collie, German Shepard are required
If, however, we instead want to distinguish between young and old animals we would use labels related to age; newborn, adolescent, adult, senior. The labels, the training instances, and the desired task are inextricably linked. Labeling may seem trivial for something as familiar as dogs and cats but in general it can be a difficult, expensive and time consuming process to attain enough training instances of each label to produce highly accurate machine learning models

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